Yachting News

Two New Yachts for Italian Sea Group

Two Yachts Delivered by the Italian Sea Group

 

Flying Dragon

The Italian Sea Group has announced the delivery of two superyachts this month, the 40m Low Profile, a sleek and timeless motor yacht and the 45m Flying Dragon, a distinctive superyacht with a design which will undoubtedly turn heads at the Monaco Yacht Show.

Flying Dragon
The Admiral Regale 45 (a.k.a. “Flying Dragon”) has been recently delivered at The Italian Sea Group and is set to debut at the Monaco Yacht Show later this month. Her distinctive exterior profiles features a fast planing hull built entirely in aluminum and able to reach a top speed of around 27 knots.

She is a raised pilot house design yacht, with an elegant light blue hull enriched by a blue dragon graphic on both sides, which has been designed by Dobroserdov Design.

The hard top covering part of the sun deck features a teak ceiling with the graphic of a TAO while the 4 guest cabins are located on the lower deck and include two twin bed cabins and two double VIPs, all with ensuite bathrooms.

Low Profile
The Tecnomar Nadara 40 M/Y “Low Profile” is the second yacht delivered by the Italian Sea Group this month and a stunning example of modern engineering.

She features a fast planing hull entirely built in aluminum and can reach a top speed of over 26 knots. Low Profile is a tri-deck yacht with modern and captivating lines. The dark grey color of the hull creates an elegant contrast with the soft grey of the superstructure, lowering the all profile of the yacht and delivering a sporty and sleek design.

The main deck features a spacious main saloon enriched with top quality furniture and upholstery which include precious fabrics, a bar with a marble top, a large handmade table for up to 10 people with a glass backlit panel set in the center, mirrored ceilings with brass inserts and crystal lamps.

An insight into Artemis Racing

Iain Percy talks about the road ahead for Artemis Racing!

Iain Percy

“Freddie Loof, he’s our king”, said a Swedish friend at Artemis Racing’s formal announcement in Stockholm. “Of the medals that Sweden won at the last Olympics, his was the only gold.”

Based on that, and of course on the Swedish Star legend’s long and successful sailing career, it’s easy to see why the local media was excited about his appointment to the Artemis Racing America’s Cup campaign. He is joined by his 2014 Star crew Max Salminen adding to the national roll call and increasing the number of Artemis Racing team members that have Olympic medals.

Loof and Salminen’s announcement was also good news for me as Artemis Racing’s team manager Iain Percy wasn’t surrounded by a barrage of TV crews and fluffy microphones making it far easier to sit down and have a chat about the current state of Cup affairs.

“Apart from confirming our entry for the 35th America’s Cup and introducing three of our latest recruits, the message we wanted to send out was that we’re here to win, so don’t be surprised,” said Percy.

Part of that message was driven home by other appointments to the team, in particular Rod Davies, previously Team New Zealand’s head coach, an impressive catch.

“It’s like Real Madrid stealing Manchester United’s coach,” said Percy.

Elsewhere in the 40 strong team there are other examples of players with serious Cup experience and the latest technical know how including multihull legend Loic Peyron, renowned designer Vincent Lauriot-Prevost and structures expert Herve Devaux.

“One of the big differences this time is that we’ve been able to go out and hire talented people, Torbjorn [Tornqvist – team principal] has given me both the backing and the confidence to go out and hire the best,” he continued. “That’s not to say that we didn’t have talent in the team before, but this time one of the key factors is personality. As well as a passion to win we want to build a group of people that are confident yet modest. It’s something that’s always been important to me in our Olympic campaigns, its how Bart and I ran things.

“But its still going to be a huge challenge, even with the right people. After the last Cup we had a reputation as being a nice team to work for. This time around it’s my job to prove to people that we’re a nice team that can win.”

Yet among the list of talented team members with their long and detailed CV’s that make up the 40 strong group there is another aspect of this team that stands out and could well prove to be a big advantage when the pressure comes on.
Unlike Ben Ainslie Racing and Team New Zealand, Artemis Racing is fully underwritten by an individual. Torbjorn Tornqvist is not just a quietly spoken, intellectual individual with deep enough pockets to fund the campaign without blinking, but he believes fervently that there is no ‘I’ in team and is well known as an accomplished sailor and helmsman in his own right. In this respect and in current Cup circles he is unique. According to Percy his style is as far from dictatorial as you can get. He is frequently consulted for advice on a variety of matters, yet seeks the opinions of his team rather than issuing instructions. From the outside at least, the apparent lack of pressure to find commercial partners to ensure that the campaign has the resources to go the distance allows the team to focus on the key elements, the boat, the people and the strategy.

“He frequently helps with the decision making but he’s not on top of us all the time,” continued Percy. “The fact that he dresses just like us in the same team gear is just one small indication as to how he sees himself in the team. But he’s really good at seeing the big picture. For example, he was the one who was pushing to include a youth programme into our campaign. He was also the one who made some of the key signings like Nathan Outteridge early on in our campaign last time around.”

“We’re a tight team with very little management,” he continued. “I remember Grant Simmer, for whom I have the utmost respect, telling me that at Alinghi there was never a vote on key issues, the room just knew which way to go when’s the issues had been debated. That’s much like the way we run our team – it’s also what I’m used to. In our Olympic campaign I never controlled Bart and he never controlled me, but as a team with good people around us the right key decisions were made.”

But for all the team harmony within the Artemis camp the bottom line is that the plans for the 35th Cup are still in a delicate place. At this stage in the proceedings, with the Defender trying to hang onto its advantages and the Challengers trying to get the best deal for themselves, there are plenty of opportunities for the Cup cycle to come off the rails as the post 2007 debacle proves. Yet this time around all the teams whether they be Challengers or the Defender, know how important it is to make sure that a mutually acceptable Cup cycle is achieved.

“If nothing else, everyone sees that after the huge positive impact of the last Cup, the next cycle offers a huge opportunity, not just for America’s Cup racing but for the sport as a whole,” said Percy. “When all the i’s are dotted and the t’s crossed then it might be time to start thinking about how to get one over, but until then its crucially important to get the 35th Cup sorted.

“There is a new generation of competitors involved this time around, the boat has played a part in that, but within that new generation there’s a group of us who have been through the tough times after 2007 and seen how disruptive the Cup can be. As a result many of us are very keen to make sure that this cycle works, plus I think that we don’t have the same levels of paranoia that might have been present before.”

Yet above all else there’s one message that comes through loud and clear from someone who has seen several different approaches and Cup cycles from tough times and tiny budgets in the +39 campaign, to the personal emotional roller coaster of the last America’s Cup, the next Cup has huge potential.

“The America’s Cup has always had the ability to transform the sport and I firmly believe that this next cycle is going to be the biggest spectacle in our sport.”

And that Sweden now has its own sailing rock stars in its own America’s Cup team.

Coastguard opens new rescue centre

controls

This week, the UK’s HM Coastguard has finally completed a major piece of reorganisation that has been dogged by controversy and accusals of repeated U-turns. Solent and Portland Maritime Co-ordination Centres, which cover some of the busiest waters in the country, were relocated to a new National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham in Hampshire. This is all part of a long-running government plan to modernise the service.

The bases in Portland and Lee-on-Solent are to close as the centralised control room starts operations in Fareham in premises originally built for the fire service. From the end of this week, the new centre will control and co-ordinate rescues along the UK south coast from Dover to Falmouth. MRCCs in both those ports take over at each extremity.Since consultation began in 2011 on what was termed ‘a long-overdue need to bring the way Coastguard rescues are coordinated into the 21st century’ the proposals have met public opposition, centred around the closure of Coastguard stations such those on the Clyde in Scotland, Brixham, Portland, Yarmouth and Inverness, concerns about coastguard lay-offs and a perceived reduction of local knowledge.The plans have, however, had the support of the Royal Yachting Association (RYA). Stuart Carruthers, cruising manager of the RYA, explains: “As far as you and I are concerned, there is no change in the Coastguard’s way of working. It’s about command and control, how they manage the assets; the lifeboats and aerial systems are not changing. I recognise the concerns but I don’t believe they are founded. This is just the management being centralised and integrated.”The RYA expects benefits from the reorganisation. “It has taken a system that was fairly disjointed because calls couldn’t be passed from one MRCC to another, and made a nationally integrated system that provides far greater resilience from our point of view and really should have been done a long time ago,” comments Carruthers.

Since last year Humber MRCC has been co-ordinating rescues for the majority of the UK east coast from Southwold to the Scottish border. Carruthers comments “That has been working well.”

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